L’utilisation des majuscules – The use of uppercase letters

Les points cardinaux commencent par une lettre majuscule s’ils indiquent une région déterminée mais par une lettre miniscule s’ils indiquent une direction.

Exemples: Nous voyageons dans le Sud (région). Le vent du sud (direction).

===

In French, the cardinal points start with an uppercase letter if they refer to a region but with a lowercase letter if they refer to a direction.

Examples: Nous voyageons dans le Sud (région). Le vent du sud (direction).

About these ads

4 Responses to L’utilisation des majuscules – The use of uppercase letters

  1. Eddy Young says:

    This post is very useful to me, as I am always confused by capitalisation of cardinal points. Now I need to figure out how not to confuse the French and English usages!

    A few ideas for future posts:

    * How to capitalise nationalities (that is, “français” versus “Français”)
    * How to punctuate properly

  2. pngpingching says:

    Eddy: Thanks for the suggestions.

  3. clive says:

    Now i better understand why i scored poorly in french at school.. Thought the french were very fanatic abt their culture. Did not pay much attention to the cardinal points or directions. I used upper case after a punctuation and small letters for the rest.

  4. pngpingching says:

    French language has tons of rules. At first glance, people might think that because of these rules French is more difficult than other languages like English. To be fair, they are not totally wrong. However, once one starts to learn these same rules, one starts to see that they serve a purpose: to avoid confusion. For example, in French, “e” and “é” are not pronounced the same way, and there is little room for mistake. But, in English, “e” can be pronounced differently. In “Adobe” and in “pie,” “e” is pronounced differently.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: